Big Bang Moments

Figure this scenario. Moses busy picking ticks and fleas from his favorite lamb one lazy afternoon by the green meadows near the river Jordan and a weird voice from the wilderness reverberates from nowhere revealing to him the origins of the universe “… you see, helium and hydrogen are the building blocks of the universe… nitrogen and oxygen are the building blocks of life ” Huh ? For someone who didn’t take up Chemistry 101 the language was a bit too complex and cryptic for the itinerant herdsman to comprehend so a much simpler version was put forth to make it more intelligible, one that collapses some 13.7 billion years spanning the creation and evolution of the universe into mere 7 earthly days. Yet despite the collosal abridgement, Moses’ Genesis 1 and the Big Bang Theory have startling similarities, at least in the chronology of events. The appearance of light, the formation of the firmament, land and water and eventually life forms on earth occur in the same order. The notion of man being created from dust and eventually returning to dust jibes with the scientific theory that we all came from the stars, from the combination and permutation of dust, or chemical elements, the building block of matter and life, particles and gas which were strewn into the cosmos, from the fallout from exploding stars that found their way into our earth’s atmosphere.

What is even more astounding is 2,000 years later, Moses’ descendants have the audacity to perform a reverse-engineering of creation of the universe and postulate a theory of its origin. To some people it is pure heresy to even doubt or second guess Moses’ pronouncements. Proving him wrong whether accidentally or on purpose would be tantamount a condemnation to eternal damnation. It could also be heretical to question the origins of other matter, like postulating origin of water , to say that water likewise came from the celestial bodies – comets and asteroids that constantly bombarded and collided with our earth in the formative stages of our solar system. If science and religion must not mix, those fearful of retribution from their earthly peers would be appeased to know that the Big Bang Theory was actually proposed by a shepherd of the flock, a Belgian priest and scientist by the name of Georges Lemaitre.

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